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Thread: JuicedLink slider

  1. #51
    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krute View Post
    I actually thought of using model railway track at first. But the cost put me off. Even for kids' toy track, it's not super cheap. Besides, rolling wheels make noise.
    When the track is acoustically separated from it's base, then no. You only hear those wheels because a modeltrain layout has the design of a guitar body.
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  2. #52
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Can't believe they sell that for 180$...especially after seeing that video about it:



    On a side note, I think I've found a way to make it "life-proof". I'm drawing it right now, should be able to scan it later today and post it right after.
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

  3. #53
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    When the track is acoustically separated from it's base, then no. You only hear those wheels because a modeltrain layout has the design of a guitar body.
    But the track has to be fixed to some kind of base. I guess a length of pine would work.

    Another thought; If you used wheel bearings, you could slip a small but broad rubber band over them.

  4. #54
    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    I guess a length of pine would work
    That's the plan - mahogany is more termite proof though. I build my N-scale layout on 1/4" plywood - a cacophony! Using trucks with plastic wheels helps a lot with the noise. My el cheapo plastic wheeled cars run more quiet than the metal wheel Master Series.

    There are flat rubber bands available in different sizes to give locomotives more pulling power. You'll have to machine a nudge into your wheels though to keep them rubbers in place.
    What you call a grumpy German? - Sour Kraut

  5. #55
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    There are flat rubber bands available in different sizes to give locomotives more pulling power. You'll have to machine a nudge into your wheels though to keep them rubbers in place.
    Yet another thought, (having a lot today!); what about the wheel hubs from remote control cars? You could slip several rubber bands over them, into the recess, until the rubber extended just beyond the rim of the hub. You'd leave a gap so that the hub would sit over the track... somehow.

    The tyres that come with those things are far too soft, because they're meant to collapse, so they wouldn't take the weight of a camera.

  6. #56
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    They sell something "professionally" that's made using a ladder...I'll start my own buisness then:



    Seriously, I've watched a lot of DIY stuff and "pro" sliders/dolly and I really think for the price that anyone is better doing it on his own, can't really go wrong.
    Mine will probably look more like this, and I plan to have the boggey adjustable on the width, so you can tight it when it's on the rail.

    I also plan to have three bearings each corner: one on top, bottom and on the exterior side (like the previous picture)
    I plan to instal a L alulminium bracket on the inside of the rails to hold on "rungs" like Janke suggested.
    So it'll look more like that, but smaller:


    Here's my draw:
    Slider.jpg
    Top left: I plan to insert the bearings (0°) between the top and bottom part, where the 90° bearing will be.
    Top right: it shows that the top and bottom part holds the 90° bearings on top and below the square aluminium tube/rails
    Lower left: it shows that a long bolt will hold all the parts together from the plate to the bottom part.
    Lower right: That's how I actually plan to have the rails to hold: with an aluminium "L" part bolted inside the rails, each "L" being bolted to a "rung" holding everything together. All rungs at probably 12 or 18 inches from one to the other.

    That's it kids, I'll try to update the design tonight and come up with something better tomorow.
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

  7. #57
    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    That'd work. You have to build your trucks yourself then, though. Might even be cheaper than LGB trucks.
    That's how modeltrain track (N-scale) looks. Janke could give you an example of something bigger:

    P7103806.jpg
    What you call a grumpy German? - Sour Kraut

  8. #58
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    That'd work. You have to build your trucks yourself then, though. Might even be cheaper than LGB trucks.
    That's how modeltrain track (N-scale) looks. Janke could give you an example of something bigger:
    Thanks Cg. I tried (ten years ago) with bearings that looked like that on "L" galvanized metal rails, but it wasn't great.

    I'll stick with the 0°-90°-0° bearings setup and it should be life-proof then. Otherwise, maybe the actual setup with the updated rails would just be ok too?
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

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    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    Janke could give you an example of something bigger:


    184 mm (7-1/4") gauge...


  10. #60
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    184 mm (7-1/4") gauge...
    Show me one where you used a video equipment on that and I'll buy it!
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

  11. #61
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    184 mm (7-1/4") gauge...
    I'd be tempted to add a little electric traction motor to that setup, powered through a pot, so it would go along at a nice, even rate and slow down smoothly. And you could stand back and watch the shot on a monitor. Of course, you might get a little motor whine on your soundtrack.

    But seriously, at least it would avoid wobbles from nervous hands.

  12. #62
    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drapeama View Post
    Show me one where you used a video equipment on that and I'll buy it!
    Here - the camera (+ cameraman!) was on such bogies on a parallel track:



    - as you can see, we tried to make my model train look big, by using low angles and wide and/or long lenses...


  13. #63
    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krute View Post
    I'd be tempted to add a little electric traction motor to that setup, powered through a pot, so it would go along at a nice, even rate and slow down smoothly.
    Done that, here it is, but without a camera - a couple of small kids, instead. But that proves it could very well take the weight of a HV20 or even a T3i... :



    - powered by a windshield wiper motor and two car batteries, all inside the plywood hood.

    Since my track is portable, I actually could dismantle it, and set it up on a filming location...


  14. #64
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Ah, I never get tired of watching steam trains, no matter what size they are!

    In that first film, if you'd had a featureless horizon in the background, (or even a painted scenic flat), and sprinkled tiny stones amongst the track gravel, the illusion would have been perfect, (as if you need me to tell you that!)

    The second shot of that sequence is startlingly convincing, with the train coming at you in long shot like that. For a moment I thought you had substituted a shot of a real train, seriously.

    And yes, I think you might be right about that second setup - it just might be able to handle a HV40 without too much strain.....

    Janke, that is all your land there, isn't it? I mean, that's your back yard? Just beautiful, Mr J.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krute View Post
    that is all your land there, isn't it?
    No. The first video is shot at our Railway Museum in Hyvinkää (http://rautatie.org/web/en/default.asp).

    The second video is at our family's "summer place" in Hanko.

    But, enough hijacking this thread - back to smaller sliders & tracks...


  16. #66
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    The second video is at our family's "summer place" in Hanko.
    Yeah, that's the one I was referring to. That's your place near the sea, with its own beach, eh? I'm not a "flower" man, but to see all those different-coloured flowers amongst the pines and the bushes - just looks beautiful.

    But, enough hijacking this thread - back to smaller sliders & tracks...
    Oh, all right... I've actually got something to post about that. I found some old teflon thingos for the putting on the ends of tables legs for the shifting of same..........

    Tested their friction properties on my aluminium track, and I have to say the coarse felt pads slide better. I also gave the track a buff with a dab of Plastic Polish and it came up like a mirror! And the felt pads glide on it like ice!

    Also had an inspiration from that video advertising that "Dual Dolly RS" thing. In that video they show it leaning against a wall, to make a kind of crane shot. With my track, I could add a pulley and winding handle, and have it completely perpendicular, thus getting proper rising crane shots in one vertical/horizontal plane.

    I'll post pix of what I mean when I've finished it. Matter of fact, since I promised to show y'all my prop collection a while back, I'll post a video of it, using the track.

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    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    Krute, do you live close to the sea? Then don't use aluminum - extruded or cast - without a good sealing paint. Salt spray is going to attack the surface, and you end up with sandpaper (can't remember the exact chemical reaction).
    What you call a grumpy German? - Sour Kraut

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    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    Krute, do you live close to the sea? Then don't use aluminum - extruded or cast - without a good sealing paint. Salt spray is going to attack the surface, and you end up with sandpaper (can't remember the exact chemical reaction).
    No, CG. When I say I live on the east coast, it's like a New Yorker saying he lives on the east. My town, Brisbane, is about 60 miles inland from the seaside.

    And I'm going to keep the working surfcae of the track protected with vinyl spray protectant, (dunno what you call it there), and see if that preserves it.

    In any case, it's eay to buff up the surface when necessary, by rubbing with Brasso or similar metal polish.

  19. #69
    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    Ah, Brisbane! OK.

    If you are away from any salt, you should do fine.Once the surface is already attacked, Brasso will make it even worse. Had that problem with my table saw (aluminum cast table).
    What you call a grumpy German? - Sour Kraut

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    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    Once the surface is already attacked, Brasso will make it even worse. Had that problem with my table saw (aluminum cast table).
    Good to know. I've never had occasion to use Brasso on aluminium before this. I do know that once it's become oxidised, it's extremely difficult to restore. I'll try the vinyl spray and if that doesn't work there's always the silicone. Anything to keep air from direct contact with the surface.

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    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Time for bed here. Way past time, in fact.

    Cheers.

  22. #72
    Senior Member homestar_kevin's Avatar
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    Great work Drapes!!

    I don't know how I missed this thread for so long.

    I am going to try and build mine this week.

    As of now I plan on using the Ikea kitchen shelf as rails, but your slider plate looks great, and pretty much in line with that I want to do.

    Skate bearings are definitely the way to go, and so are the rungs throughout the track. Best and simplest way to add stability.

    How are the square tracks working out for you? any big reason to go for them other than the style of cart/slider you were basing it off of?

    in your first design with the PVC, how did that cart design work? with the top and diagonal bearings?

    I realize the majority of this is just building your platform and tweaking from there, but I'm excited to get my slide onnnnn


    **EDIT** also, didn't you have a thread for when you put your mattebox together as well? I fall in love everytime I see that thing and have started collecting pieces to build myself one of those too. You used a DVD case and some epoxy right?

  23. #73
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Hey guys, just received this link in my email via the JuicedLink blog subsciption:
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

  24. #74
    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homestar_kevin View Post
    Great work Drapes!!
    [...] Skate bearings are definitely the way to go, and so are the rungs throughout the track. Best and simplest way to add stability.
    How are the square tracks working out for you? any big reason to go for them other than the style of cart/slider you were basing it off of?
    in your first design with the PVC, how did that cart design work? with the top and diagonal bearings?

    **EDIT** also, didn't you have a thread for when you put your mattebox together as well? I fall in love everytime I see that thing and have started collecting pieces to build myself one of those too. You used a DVD case and some epoxy right?
    1) Thanks, it's not that much work. I just had the maine Idea, tried some settings and once you got the right ones, it's quite easy to do. When it'll be the final version, I'll post the details for sure.
    2) Yep, I didn't really like the idea of something that's based on friction. Right when you put a little more weight it can become a problem. Never tried, but I suppose, as it only "slides" on it so there's friction.
    3) Damn well! Way better than the pvc pipes. More stable and more solid. The square tracks doesn't bend as much as the PVC pipes and are more "flat", there's no bumb in it so the bearings just rolls smoothly on it. The main reason was because of the cart design: easier to buil as there's no angles, everything is 90° or 0°, you just drill, tap the threads and screw everything together. And the aluminium, as I said, doesn't bend as easily as the pipes.
    4) Quite well, but as the pipes were bending, even at 48inches long, the kart was horizontaly tilting because of the bending. That's why I had the idea of going 90° instead and using the aluminium square tubes, which are a little more expansive, but produce better results.

    5) Yeah, here's some pictures that could help you. I really don't have the time to spend on that for others, even if many were interested...
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

  25. #75
    Infallible (& formerly known as Krute) Jim E's Avatar
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    Looking at all these ideas for sliders, I think there's one thing they all have in common. They are all so small.

    I was working on my own slider, and just to get an idea of how it would work, I put my T2i on the track and imagined myself filming.

    Immediately, it occurred to me that, if that was a real filming situation, with other people around, and me trying to concentrate on directing, and also attending to sliding the thing repeatedly as I practised the shot, and leaving it unattended while I went to speak to actors, or whatever, I'd be extremely nervous about the safety of my camera if I was using one of those little two-bar, wheeled setups.

    I'd hate to be doing all that, and at the same time having to keep checking on the camera on its little wheels on its flimsy tracks and hoping nobody bumped anything near it and brought the whole thing crashing.

    So I decided that I would make my tracks a solid and chunky as possible. The camera carrier will actually sit inside the channels of a solid three-channel piece of track, similar to the floor tracks of large sliding doors. And to be doubly safe, there will be wheels set on the rear side of the track, to make it impossible to get off. The carrier will have to be slipped on to the end of the track and once on, it won't be removable.

    Yes, my system will look like extreme overkill. Like swatting flies with a hammer. But the advantage will be that I'll never have to give the camera a second thought, while I give my full attention to all the other details of shooting a scene.

    I'll use the piece of ladder extrusion that I already have, as a crane arm.

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