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Thread: Advanced CC - After & Before frame

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Cool Advanced CC - After & Before frame

    hey,
    here's little time consuming, my custom CC process, it takes aprox. 6-7 seconds per frame at 3.0 GHZ Pentium 2 GB RAM (a lot, some could say), but what you think about final look?

    ps. Footage isn't mine, just took sample frame for test.
    josh

    before:


    after:

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    too much noise, you've altered the blue channel that's why. also it seems you've added some grain in post. lots of aliased edges there from the sharpen filter. anyway that's a rather bad hv20 footage, don't know what setting he used but that's bad, has a phone camera feeling.

    7s on 3ghz... it seems too much for that difference. what software?
    Last edited by mik; 2007 August 7th at 07:04.

  3. #3
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    hey mik,
    thanks for feedback. Yeah that's what I thought - isn't PERFECT look rather experimental.
    Noise is added. More less, if you watch closely all 95% blockbuster movies always look "too much blue". I don't know if that's style or natural processes of real film etc.
    It's Photoshop CS all the way.
    cheers
    Last edited by redwave; 2007 August 7th at 07:22.

  4. #4
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    no, i said you've altered the blue channel which always has blocking and noise.

  5. #5
    Previously geeking out over 2/3" Scarlet. Scarlet-X...not so much.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redwave View Post
    More less, if you watch closely all 95% blockbuster movies always look "too much blue". I don't know if that's style or natural processes of real film etc.
    Nope, it's just a trend. Fashion.

    The bluish low saturation / high contrast look has it's origins on chemical process though - one gets that look if the film is developed "wrong", skipping bleaching.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleach_bypass

    This is rarely done nowdays though, the look is just emulated in color correction.
    Last edited by Halsu; 2007 August 7th at 08:10.

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