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View Full Version : What are those opening animation things for movie companies called?



chaotictax
2009 April 15th, 22:48
I have a feeling this is gonna be an obvious question to answer, but I want to make an opening animation for my "production", whenever I see a movie, I'll see the company have an animation (Like with Fox you'll see the headlights and the big fox sign, and with universal pictures you'll see the planet spinning and the title revolve in.)

MithrilFox
2009 April 15th, 23:22
I've heard them referred to as "logo intro" or "intro logo" or "company intro."

I wish I knew a more precise name.

As for how to make them, I use Motion (part of the FCS suite). It's all motion graphics for the most part.

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 15th, 23:45
I have a feeling this is gonna be an obvious question to answer, but I want to make an opening animation for my "production", whenever I see a movie, I'll see the company have an animation (Like with Fox you'll see the headlights and the big fox sign, and with universal pictures you'll see the planet spinning and the title revolve in.)

Studio Logo or Opening Logo are the generic terms....the former for a Fox or MGM, the latter for a Lucasfilm or Amblin. There are also Logo Treatment and Logo Animation if it's in motion. IIRC, my Pacific Title bills for adding our loop to 35mm prints say "Opening Logo Insert." When we deal with multiple studios, we usually use Distributor Logo for the regional franchise holder and Studio Logo for the master rights holder...

1
2009 April 16th, 00:00
"What are those opening animation things for movie companies called?"

I call them: BLOODY ANNOYING to watch if there's more than 2! :hv20-smilie77:

bluegrass
2009 April 16th, 00:06
"What are those opening animation things for movie companies called?"

I call them: BLOODY ANNOYING to watch if there's more than 2! :hv20-smilie77:


Ya. What's the deal. I notice about 3 different production companies taking credit for a lot of movies lately. Is it that they're so expensive that the costs frequently get split up between several studios or whatever they are. And yes, it does get a little agrivating two have sit through more than one.

BWC
2009 April 16th, 00:28
There are seven, count em, seven at the end of each episode of TMZ.

chaotictax
2009 April 16th, 00:38
Thanks guys, and I agree COMPLETELY about how annoying it gets to watch when there are too many.

MithrilFox
2009 April 16th, 00:54
This is another case of the "nobody cares how it's made/who makes it, they just like what they like."

I like the idea of having those things come at the END of a show/movie, thereby not forcing us to watch them.

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 16th, 01:10
This is another case of the "nobody cares how it's made/who makes it, they just like what they like."


Actually, the people who put up the money for those shows like to see their name on the product so that, hopefully, people will remember their names and be more interested in their future productions.

Why don't they stick them at the end? Because the vast majority of people don't stick around for the credits, even though filmmakers have been sticking post-credit sequences in films for fifty years. (I've lost track of how many die hard comics fans I knew who were totally poleaxed when I asked them what they thought of the Nick Fury scene in Ironman.)

EssentialParadox
2009 April 16th, 19:08
Why don't they stick them at the end? Because the vast majority of people don't stick around for the credits, even though filmmakers have been sticking post-credit sequences in films for fifty years. (I've lost track of how many die hard comics fans I knew who were totally poleaxed when I asked them what they thought of the Nick Fury scene in Ironman.)

Their loss. I haven't left a movie until the end credits were finished in years. I think it's only fair to check out the people who made the movie (plus you can surprisingly learn a lot by paying close attention to the break-down of the crew). If my friends want to leave before they're over I tell them they'll need to wait outside for me. I was the only person left in the theater for the post-credit endings for Iron Man, Max Payne, and a handful of other movies. It's a nice little reward the filmmakers give to the die hards. :)

cornreaper
2009 April 16th, 19:41
C'mon, what would Star Wars be without the FOX theme and logo at the beginning? Now, every time I see a FOX movie, a little tiny part of me kind of expects the opening logo to be followed by a scrolling prologue drifting off into space.

1
2009 April 16th, 19:49
I think it's only fair to check out the people who made the movie...

You'd have a hard time watching the flicks on the telly then, as they often make them whiz past in 10 seconds or less...I guess they're just too scared of channel switching.

Although: I did watch something recently, and by gosh, the end credits went on FOREVER. The 2nd Narnia IIRC...or maybe some other flick.
They seemed to be thanking the entire country where it was filmed...INDIVIDUALLY!

Rumpelgeist
2009 April 16th, 20:14
What is TMZ?

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 17th, 00:50
What is TMZ?

TMZ on TV, a gossip show. (TMZ referring to TMZ.com, which in turn was an acronym for Thirty Mile Zone)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TMZ_on_

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 17th, 00:59
Although: I did watch something recently, and by gosh, the end credits went on FOREVER. The 2nd Narnia IIRC...or maybe some other flick.
They seemed to be thanking the entire country where it was filmed...INDIVIDUALLY!

Naw... if it was Narnia you saw, there weren't nearly enough credits for shepherds. :hv20-smilie81:

Ian-T
2009 April 17th, 00:59
(I've lost track of how many die hard comics fans I knew who were totally poleaxed when I asked them what they thought of the Nick Fury scene in Ironman.)Good point. I was going to mention that till I read this. Lol

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 17th, 01:27
Good point. I was going to mention that till I read this. Lol

The thing is, I think a lot of filmmakers are partially oblivious to the scope of this phenomenon, since in L.A. a huge number of people stay through the credits... half of whom are industry people looking for the names of people they know who they can hopefully network through, the third quarter of which is split between agents and union enforcers trying to catch people cheating on their respective contracts and the final quarter is people justifying the fact that they're going to write the ticket off as market research.

MithrilFox
2009 April 18th, 05:39
Actually, the people who put up the money for those shows like to see their name on the product so that, hopefully, people will remember their names and be more interested in their future productions.

Why don't they stick them at the end? Because the vast majority of people don't stick around for the credits, even though filmmakers have been sticking post-credit sequences in films for fifty years. (I've lost track of how many die hard comics fans I knew who were totally poleaxed when I asked them what they thought of the Nick Fury scene in Ironman.)

We're a special bunch of people... we, more than most people, are interested in things like who made what and how it was made...

And even many of us don't care for those studio logos.

Reality is that the average person doesn't care to see them, and wouldn't mind if they were completely gone. Brevity is so important, yet they seem to be making them as long as ever.

EDIT: I didn't mean to imply that they're bad or that we shouldn't have any studio logos, if I had a studio of my own I'd make my own logo too! I want to say that in consideration of viewers, we should keep them very short and simple.

bluegrass
2009 April 18th, 10:38
This is another case of the "nobody cares how it's made/who makes it, they just like what they like."

I like the idea of having those things come at the END of a show/movie, thereby not forcing us to watch them.

Who says they come at the end. All the movies I watch, they throw them at you before the movie starts. I would like to see a list of all these off the wall names & logos that play a part in the making of a movie. Just for the Hollywood movies, it must be a huge list. Maybe they should sublimally distribute them through out the movie.

MithrilFox
2009 April 18th, 11:24
Who says they come at the end. All the movies I watch, they throw them at you before the movie starts. I would like to see a list of all these off the wall names & logos that play a part in the making of a movie. Just for the Hollywood movies, it must be a huge list. Maybe they should sublimally distribute them through out the movie.

Hence why I said I prefer them at the end, precisely because they're at the beginning and I don't want to sit through them. They're unnecessarily long and they have a ridiculous number of them. Sometimes I feel like we watch 6 of them before a movie.

bluegrass
2009 April 18th, 13:55
I sometimes rate them on how inventive and cool their logo looks.

When did the multiple name dropping & production logos start. It seems like they crept in during the seventies or eighties.

Now just imagine all the avatars on this site scrolling by in the beginning of a movie. Which one would draw your attention or you would like.

Matt Greenfield
2009 April 18th, 14:22
When did the multiple name dropping & production logos start. It seems like they crept in during the seventies or eighties.



It's been around for a long time, but it was really pushed into prominence during the 70's, first with non-film companies like Playboy, then with filmmakers like Coppola and Lucas wanting to establish their own American Zoetrope and Lucasfilm brands over the distributors, and also with the mini-major studios like Orion, Cannon and the Ladd Company. It escalated with the multiple studio buyouts, but what makes it more noticeable these days is that it's moved from simple nameplates to elaborate cg animations for everything.